In the previous post I described OperationContext class and provided basic usage examples. In this post I am going to focus on the shared access signature concept.

Read more...

In the previous post I described how QueueRequestOptions can be used and provided simple examples. In this post I will continue to work with Azure Storage Queue. I am going to describe an important parameter OperationContext.

Read more...

In the previous post I described how MessageId and PopReceipt can be used and provided simple examples. In this post I will continue to work with Azure Storage Queue Service. I am going to describe an important parameter QueueRequestOptions.

Read more...

In the previous post I described how to work with Azure Storage Queue Service and provided simple examples. In this post I will continue to work with Azure Storage Queue Service. I am going to describe more advanced scenarios and showcase them in code.

Read more...

There are many ways to interact with Azure Storage Queue, one of them is from C# code using Windows Azure Storage Library. This client library enables working with the Microsoft Azure storage services which include the blob and file service for storing binary and text data, the table service for storing structured non-relational data, and the queue service for storing messages that may be accessed by a client. In this post I will show how to work with Azure Storage Queue Service.

Read more...

Azure Queue storage is a service for storing large numbers of messages that can be accessed from anywhere in the world via authenticated calls using HTTP or HTTPS. It provides cloud messaging between application components. In designing applications for scale, application components are often decoupled, so that they can scale independently. Queue storage delivers asynchronous messaging for communication between application components, whether they are running in the cloud, on the desktop, on an on-premises server, or on a mobile device. Queue storage also supports managing asynchronous tasks and building workflows.

Read more...

There are two ways to manage resources in Azure: Classic and Resource Manager. Resource Manager is the recommended way now, you can read more about resource manager at Azure Resource Manager overview. Microsoft will enable Resource Manager for every service that is important for future solutions, but until the support is consistent, you need to know the current status for each service. For example it is possible to use Azure Storage cmdlets in a resource manager context, you can mix them easily.

Read more...

Azure PowerShell is a set of modules that provide command line interface to Azure. You can accomplish almost everything using Azure PowerShell. It's obvious now that Microsoft investing lots of effort into command line tools for its products and it's great! There are two command line interfaces implementation - PowerShell and Azure CLI. Personally I don't use Azure CLI very often because I primary work on windows systems, but people who work with *nix systems are first-class citizens now in Microsoft world, so they have their own tool. The funny thing is that Microsoft released PowerShell for Linux. So developers can use both Azure PowerShell and Azure CLI regardless operation system they use.

Read more...

;